7 Reasons we MUST have a Revolution in how we treat Persisting Pain

7 Reasons we MUST have a Revolution in how we treat Persisting Pain

Friday, March 24, 2017

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Lissanthea Taylor

RECENT Posts

  1. The One Thing this Pain Revolution Needs
    01 Apr, 2017
    The One Thing this Pain Revolution Needs
    This Revolution needs you. We're aiming to reach out, person by person, in to rural communities in Australia. Rather than waiting for people to come to the clinic, or letting people slip through the healthcare cracks to a place of desperation, we're getting on our bikes and getting the message out there. We know we have good science. And until now, the science has lived locked away from most people, in academic papers and conference proceedings. It's lived in Explain Pain, and in the
  2. Two Smart Brains, One Big Idea
    01 Apr, 2017
    Two Smart Brains, One Big Idea
    Without the 16 year partnership of research, writing and teaching between David Butler and Lorimer Moseley, this Pain Revolution wouldn’t exist. We wouldn’t have the academic foundations, and the community support to do something bold like put 24 Revolutionaries on bikes, and ride the message of change in how we understand and recover from pain in to rural Australia. Both David and Lorimer started out as Physiotherapists. By a function of time and place, education in that field taught them
  3. 3 Things People in Pain Want us to Know
    31 Mar, 2017
    3 Things People in Pain Want us to Know
    A huge thank you to Joletta Belton, who writes at www.mycuppajo.com for her expert input in to this post. Jo received her expert qualifications in pain through her own experience and recovery from persisting pain (although she did return to University to study it too!). She is changing the world of people in pain with the Endless Possibilites Initiative. www.epicolorado.org There’s many stories of people that have persisting pain feeling unseen and unheard in their struggles to regain
  4. 4 Cool Things you’ll find in the Brain Bus
    30 Mar, 2017
    4 Cool Things you’ll find in the Brain Bus
    We’re pretty biased, but we think nerdy things are a lot of fun. We like talking about brains and neurons and synapses (yep, even at social events) but we also realize not everyone knows why this fascinates us. The science behind the ways that we can explain pain, and understand it in a new way comes from some very cool experiments that help us understand the brain. This science is so fun that we thought it shouldn’t get left behind in the lab. We also wanted to bring Dr Tasha Stanton  and
  5. 5 Destinations on the Pain Revolution Road
    29 Mar, 2017
    5 Destinations on the Pain Revolution Road
    This wide brown land of Australia has many incredible places to see, and the stretch of the Great Ocean Road is one of the most picturesque. For a cycle tour destination, there’s wide open spaces, and beautiful vistas along that route (and sharing major roads with a lot of traffic!). Cycle touring is an incredible way to see the world (and we’re fortunate to have Steve Cunningham from procyclingskills.com leading us on our adventure). We didn’t choose this route for the scenery alone. The
  6. 6 Ways We're Helping Persisting Pain in Rural Australia
    28 Mar, 2017
    6 Ways We're Helping Persisting Pain in Rural Australia
    The contribution of rural Australia cannot be underestimated. For a long time, we rode “on the sheep’s back” and nowadays our agriculture and resources make massive contributions to our bottom line.  Yet still rural and regional populations have a tougher time with health. Rural life exposes people to specific health risks - arthritis and accidental injuries are more prevalent in the Bush. It’s harder to access specialized services, there are fewer practitioners per resident, not to mention
  7. UniSA News
    16 Mar, 2017
    UniSA News
    Below is an article featuring in the latest UniSA News A group of world-leading pain researchers will cycle more than 870 km between Melbourne and Adelaide next month to bring their findings to regional and rural communities. Led by UniSA Professor of Clinical Neuroscience, Lorimer Moseley, who has been at the forefront of research on pain and the brain for two decades, the ride will help to focus on what Prof Moseley believes is a much needed revolution in how society talks about and treats